Local cherries and beer: The impact of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station

Nikki Rothwell, coordinator of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station and a Michigan State University Extension specialist, was recently highlighted on Greening of the Great Lakes, hosted by Kirk Heinze. She was also written about in the MLive article “Michigan State University Research and Michigan Agriculture Are Making a Global Impact.”

The coverage went into detail about how the station assists commercial fruit growers in the “fruit belt” of Northwest Michigan.

When describing the impact of the station on the area, Nikki said, “It’s the hub of activity, research and information for the Michigan grower community.”

One of the major areas of research is hops production.

According to Nikki in her interview, “The major market for local hops is microbreweries. Locality is something consumers really embrace and there’s something about knowing that the hops used to make your beer were grown by a local farmer.”

With the help of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station, local growers are selling to local microbreweries, which keeps the entire production cycle local. The microbrewery market is growing as well, because many Michiganders appreciate the nature of supporting the local producer.

Hops are not the only crops being researched by the station – Rothwell spoke about the station’s contribution to the growth of the market for Michigan cherries across the country: specifically the Hungarian Balaton cherry.

“There are markets in New York City and Chicago with people from Eastern European descent that really miss their cherries from their homeland. There’s a company that trucks our Balaton cherries from northern Michigan all the way back to those markets and they get sold like hot cakes,” she said.

To see the full article and hear the interview, visit “Michigan State University Research and Michigan Agriculture Are Making a Global Impact” on MLive.

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