Category Archives: Agriculture and Agribusiness

MSU Extension team responds to help families with farm stress

A person with a hat sits in a field with a combine in the background.

About a year ago, commodity prices fell, especially affecting dairy farmers. Michigan saw a rise in attempted suicides among farmers and farm families. Michigan State University (MSU) Extension responded by forming the Farm Stress team, made up of Suzanne Pish, Adam Kantrovich, Roger Betz, Tom Cummins and Beth Stuever, to create resources for educators and others who work with farmers and their families.

The team, with the assistance of ANR Communications and Marketing, put together a fact sheet and video for farmers and farm families so that our staff could have access to resources they could use in their programming and interaction. The team also put together two programs to help Extension educators and others who work with farmers and farm families. The first was a mental health first-aid training: a full-day, hands-on, certification course that can help those people working with farmers and farm families to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental illness and emotional crisis. The second was a workshop designed for people who work with agriculture producers and farm families who want to know more about managing farm-related stress and ways to approach and communicate with those in need.

The team and the resources that they have produced are an example of how important it is that we work across institute or department lines, and that we mobilize to meet immediate needs of Michigan residents. We have our traditional programs that provide ongoing, stable service to our constituents, but we also can function in an emergency response role, just like we did in our response to the Flint water emergency.

Do you work with farmers, farm families or both? Do you have connections who do? You might want to take some time to watch the video about stress management for farmers and take a look at the other resources on our MSU Extension webpage devoted to farm stress. If you have any questions about the resources or the team’s work, feel free to reach out to Suzanne Pish.

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Filed under Agriculture, Agriculture and Agribusiness, health, Impacts, Resources, Social and emotional health

Save the date and join us for summer field days

A corn field with blue sky and clouds. The image text reads: Field Days 2017.

Michigan State University (MSU) AgBioResearch has announced the schedule for the research centers’ summer field days. These field days are an important opportunity to connect Michigan residents and industry with the latest MSU research. Often, the field days showcase research and extension through an open house format, and often offer educational opportunities and trainings. We hope that you’ll spread the word and be able to join us!

Kellogg Biological Station – Multiple Field Days
June 13 and Aug. 1, 4–8 p.m. – Pasture Dairy Center Open House
June 28 – Barley Field Day
November 3 – Cover Crops Field Day

Southwest Michigan Research and Extension Center – July 26
The 28th annual MSU Viticulture Field Day

Upper Peninsula Research and Extension Center – July 29

Montcalm Research Center – August 3

Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center – August 10
This field day features a morning program on dry beans, sugar beets, wheat, corn and soybeans. Lunch will follow.

Lake City Research Center – August 24
Ag Innovation Day: Focus on Forage and the Future

Northwest Michigan Horticulture Research Center – August 24
3 p.m. Field day will include an equipment show, dinner and the annual meeting of the Leelanau Horticulture Society.

For more information, see the MSU AgBioResearch press release about their field days.

 

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Filed under Ag Innovation Day, Agriculture, Agriculture and Agribusiness, Field Days

Congratulations to our MSU Extension 2017 NACAA award winners

Congratulations to our Michigan State University (MSU) Extension colleagues on their work and their awards from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA). They will receive their awards at the NACAA national conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, July 9–14. Take a minute to read about the work they’ve done, and check out some of their publications and other award-winning work online. Please join me in congratulating them on their achievements.

James DeDecker

Achievement Award – National Winner

James DeDecker, MSU Extension field crops educator in Presque Isle County, is being recognized as this year’s NACAA Achievement Award winner for Michigan. This prestigious award recognizes excellence in the field of professional Extension for NACAA members with less than 10 years of service. A Michigan Association of Extension Agents (MAEA) member since 2012, James has served as North Region chair, program recognition chair, professional improvement chair and most recently, secretary. James was awarded the MAEA President’s Citation in 2013 and NACAA communication awards in 2014 and 2016.

Phillip Durst

Personal Column – National Finalist

Phillip Durst and Stan Moore, both senior agriculture and agribusiness educators, were invited to write a series of six columns on topics relating to employee management for the Nebraska Cattleman magazine. According to the editor, the Nebraska Cattleman magazine goes to 15,000 producers (all industry segments) across Nebraska and into surrounding states, as well as to top seedstock, cow-calf and feedlot operations in the U.S. Phil wrote columns on recruiting employees, training employees and developing teamwork. The columns on recruitment and building teamwork were later reformatted and published in the Michigan Cattleman magazine. Read “Effective Employee Training” and “Employee Recruitment: Intentional and Continuous.”

Ronald Goldy

Video Presentation – National Finalist

Ron Goldy, MSU Extension senior agriculture and agribusiness educator, and Kraig Ehm from ANR Communications & Marketing, produced a consumer-oriented video on pickle production that showed the production process from beginning to end. The idea was to develop a high-quality educational video to educate consumers on how their food is produced and how it makes it to their tables. View the video: https://youtu.be/5BiZEBtIIdA.

Thomas Guthrie

Distinguished Service Award – National Winner

Tom Guthrie, statewide Extension educator based in Jackson County, will be representing Michigan and receiving the NACAA Distinguished Service Award. The NACAA Distinguished Service Award is presented to members who have served at least 10 years as members of the Cooperative Extension Service, who have conducted outstanding programs and who are held in high esteem by their fellow workers. Tom is in the midst of his 14th year working for MSU Extension. During that span, his responsibilities have included working within the swine and equine industries throughout the state. Tom was also recently awarded the Michigan Association of Extension 4-H Youth Staff (MAE4-HYS) colleague award for his work with colleagues on biosecurity and swine health management at county fairs. He continues to be an active member of MAEA after serving as president of MAEA and the Michigan Council of Extension Associations in 2015.

Heidi M. Lindberg

Search for Excellence in Consumer or Commercial Horticulture – National Winner

Program Promotional Piece – National Finalist

Newsletter, Individual – State Winner

Published Photo & Caption – State Winner

Fact Sheet – State Winner

Heidi Lindberg, a greenhouse and nursery Extension educator for west Michigan, was the national winner in the Search for Excellence in Consumer or Commercial Horticulture (http://www.nacaa.com/awards/apps/display_award.php?id=10354-18922) category for the Online College of Knowledge classes “Biological Control for Greenhouse Growers” and “Greenhouse and Horticultural Lighting.” She will deliver a presentation at the NACAA meeting on these two online courses. Heidi also was a national finalist for the communications award Program Promotional Piece (http://www.nacaa.com/awards/apps/display_award.php?id=10068-18922) for a flyer she developed advertising the “Biological Control for Greenhouse Growers” course. 

Ben Phillips

Feature Story – Regional Winner

Audio Recording – State Winner

Ben Phillips, an agriculture and agribusiness educator, covered a unique and long-standing event hosted by a vegetable grower in his region. His feature story, “Kraut-Making Day a Successful Marketing Tool for Michigan Vegetable Grower,” won the regional award for feature story. Ben also won the state level award for his audio recording for his interview with Nicole Heslip about Swede midge in Michigan.  Listen to the podcast: http://brownfieldagnews.com/news/139962/

Brenda Reau

Publication – Regional Winner

In her publication, Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Landscape, Brenda Reau, Extension academic specialist, showcases the work of the MSU Product Center to decision makers, industry stakeholders and key clientele. Fifteen hundred hard copies of the eight-page publication were printed and distributed statewide. Additionally, a digital version of the publication was sent to 700 individuals, posted on MSU websites and distributed through social media. MSU Extension district coordinators deemed the publication especially useful in their work with county commissioners in demonstrating the economic impact of MSU Extension programs. The publication was provided to state legislators to spotlight work with constituents in their districts. It was shared with university donors at a brunch hosted by the president of MSU.

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Filed under Agriculture and Agribusiness, Awards

Great Lakes Hop and Barley Conference in Detroit

Each spring, educators from Michigan State University (MSU) Extension with support from MSU AgBioResearch and the Michigan Brewers Guild host the Great Lakes Hop and Barley Conference. For the first time, this year the conference was held in downtown Detroit. March 2-3, over 300 agricultural producers, processors, vendors, brewers and others attended, coming from 15 states and multiple countries. The conference offered both basic and advanced sessions for hop growers, and a barley session and malting tour for both growers and brewers.

Kevin Riel, Owner of Double ‘R’ Hop Ranches, Inc. and President of Hop Growers of America, stands at the front of the room at a podium giving a presentation to a ballroom filled with seats and participants.

Kevin Riel, Owner of Double ‘R’ Hop Ranches, Inc. and President of Hop Growers of America, addresses a near capacity crowd at the 3rd annual Great Lakes Hop & Barley Conference in Detroit, MI. Photo credit: Rob Sirrine.

The conference incorporated elements that are unique to the area. For example, Dan Carmody, president of the Eastern Market Corporation, described Detroit’s increasing demand for local food and craft beer. Another Detroit highlight for participants was the evening reception held at the Detroit Beer Company. Participants left rave reviews of the location and the experiences that they had.

The conference is an important way to support all of the participants in the growing craft beverage industry. According to the national Brewers Association, Michigan ranks sixth in the United States in the number of craft breweries, and the industry creates an economic impact of $1.8 million. MSU Extension is proud of our educators who are at the forefront of education and working with this evolving industry.

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Speaking of our educators, we’d like to send a huge thank you to the conference planning committee, made up of Ashley McFarland, Erin Lizotte and Rob Sirrine, and Scott Graham from the Michigan Brewers Guild. Also, thank you to MSU Events Management (Betsy Braid and Megghan Honke) and MSU county-based staff members Annette Kleinschmit and Michelle Coleman, who helped behind the scenes.

As soon as it’s posted, I’ll link to Rob, Ashley and Erin’s news article about the conference so that you can read more about all of the opportunities that participants had, the tours and the speakers.

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Filed under Agriculture, Agriculture and Agribusiness, Conferences, Farming, Hop & Barley

An apple a day, brought to you by strategic connections

With fall in full swing, hopefully you’ve had a chance to pick up some Michigan apples from your local farmers market, orchard or grocery store. Did you know that Michigan is our country’s third largest producer of apples with more than 11.3 million apple trees on over 35,000 acres (according to the Michigan Apple Committee)? That’s 825 family-run farms that produce our juicy and delicious Pure Michigan apples. Who can bring the apple industry groups and families to the table with the university to problem-solve specific needs? Michigan State University (MSU) Extension agriculture and agribusiness educators Amy Irish-Brown and Phil Schwallier.

Through their strategic connections, Amy and Phil facilitated the creation of the lab on the Ridge near Sparta to measure apple maturity indices. The Ridge is Michigan’s major apple-producing region that is located in Kent, Ottawa and Muskegon counties. This region has the topography, soil, elevation and microclimate that are perfect for growing apples. The idea for a lab grew from a conversation Amy and Phil had on the way to a meeting about the need to closely monitor Honeycrisp and Fuji apples that had been experiencing some serious quality issues. When they pitched the idea to the Michigan Tree Fruit Commission, they received an outstanding response from the entire apple industry.

The Michigan Tree Fruit Commission responded with $50,000 in funding for the project, the Michigan Apple Committee with $15,000, and the Michigan State Horticulture Society with $20,000. Storage Control Systems responded by donating space for the lab at a value of $5,000. AgroFresh donated an automatic firmness tester (valued at $5,000) and Riveridge Produce Marketing donated the use of a quality database ($2,000). Dr. Randy Beaudry, from the MSU Department of Horticulture, donated use of a gas chromatograph ($3,000) and served as MSU specialist for this effort. When local apple growers donated fruit for testing, the lab was ready for action.

Why was there such an overwhelming response? Because Amy and Phil had formed strategic connections and relationships with the people involved in the apple industry from growers, to businesses, to campus connections.

“It’s really been a lifetime of connections that have developed and continue to develop.” Amy said. “We work with a great group of producers – they are supportive and fun. We treat everyone with respect and listen to their issues. The one-on-one connections lead to an insight into the bigger issues facing the apple industry as a whole, which best helps us help growers. Growers often just want to be growers, so sometimes, we have to make connections with media, state and federal agencies and services, commodity groups, and others to represent the interests of the apple industry for them.”

The lab has been up and running since 2015, and it provides critical real-time information to Michigan apple producers from pre-harvest through the harvest season and in post-harvest storage. Amy and Phil are able to integrate, summarize and deliver information to Michigan apple growers in concise weekly reports on apple pruning indices, nutritional impact, maturity indices for appropriate harvest, and storage indices. These reports help growers make the best real-time decisions and grow high-quality apples at a profit. Using this technology, they identify what is working well for the current year apple crop and where growers can make decisions to improve this year’s harvest outcomes.

“We have the fruit industry’s issues at heart; it is our passion.” Phil said. “To be valued, successful and admired requires knowing the people, performing tasks that address their most pressing issues, and the persistence to complete the work the growers and industry define as important. This means that ‘people skills’ is the most important characteristic an Extension person needs to have; but fruit knowledge, hard work, self-motivation and job dedication are also important. We work for the fruit industry and thus the fruit industry works for us, MSU and Michigan.”

Check out this great video created by the Michigan Apple Committee that describes growers’ relationship with MSU Extension.

Amy and Phil are a great example of strategic connections and building relationships. Have you thought about connecting with committees in your area or faculty specialists on campus? What needs to do you see in your communities that could be met by a collaboration with local businesses, companies and governmental groups?

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Filed under Agriculture, Agriculture and Agribusiness, Horticulture, Partnerships, strategic connections

Making a difference in MSU Extension District 6: Recap of the state council visit

Last week, I had the opportunity to travel north to District 6 along with our Michigan State University (MSU) Extension and AgBioResearch State Council. Shari Spoelman, district coordinator, and the crew in MSU Extension District 6 worked hard to give us a great overview of the programming, research and outreach going on in the district, and arranged for us to spend time with the people they serve.

For those of you who are new to Extension or unfamiliar with the council, we have members from all over the state who serve as a liaison between us and our county councils, field station advisory groups, and state agencies and organizations. The members come from various backgrounds: commodity group leaders, county commissioners, 4-H volunteers and farmers. We even have a meteorologist. The more they know about the work we do and the difference we make around the state, the better they can share the Extension story with our local and state decision-makers.

We began our trip with a chance to see the Kettunen Center, a conference facility owned by the Michigan 4-H Foundation. We heard about how 4-H and Extension use the center to connect with youth and volunteers. Chris Gentry, Kettunen Center director, provided us with a tour. We heard from Sara Keinath, youth development educator, and Jake Stieg, 4-H program coordinator, on the work they do with 4-H such as Mock Interview Day and 4-H Winterfest.

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Next, we traveled to B & B Farms, owned by Dan and Bonnie Blackledge, and heard about how MSU Extension and the MSU Product Center has helped them grow and market their canola seed and oil products. Jerry Lindquist, grazing and field crops educator, met us there to talk more about the relationships that MSU Extension has with specialty crop growers.

Dan and Kathy Blackledge talk about working with MSU Extension and the MSU Product Center to grow and market their canola products. Everyone stands by their house and barn.

Dan and Kathy Blackledge talk about working with MSU Extension and the MSU Product Center to grow and market their canola products.

Afterward, we visited Hidden Hills Dairy with Kathy Lee, senior dairy educator, and saw modern technology and the results of MSU Extension input at work on the farm.

State council members tour below the milking parlor where the machines send the milk.

State council members tour the milk machines below the milking parlor at Hidden Hills Dairy.

We ended the day in downtown Cadillac with Marcus Peccia, the city manager, and Carla Filkins, the mayor, to hear about their partnership with the MSU School of Planning, Design and Construction; MSU Extension and the Michigan Municipal League to create a successful placemaking plan. Marcus gave us a tour to see some of the new efforts to make downtown Cadillac a place for the community to gather as part of the Heritage Plaza PlacePlan. We saw the new amphitheater, the outdoor fireplace, the park and the future location of the Cadillac farmers market.

State Council members and administrators pose for a group photograph in downtown Cadillac.

State Council members and administrators in downtown Cadillac.

On Wednesday, Jill O’Donnell, a senior agriculture and agribusiness educator who has worked with the Michigan Christmas tree industry for over 32 years, joined us as we visited the Dutchman Tree Farm in Manton. We met with Steve VanderWeide, the owner, as he shared about farm operations and his connection with MSU Extension. We learned about the soil, tree growth process and market changes that characterize this area of the state.

Next we met up with Erin Lizotte, integrated pest management educator, at Arlene Hops to learn about hops as a re-emerging specialty crop in Michigan and MSU Extension’s efforts to provide research and support. Brian Tennis from the Michigan Hop Alliance answered questions about growing hops as well as the importance of having Extension as a valuable resource in moving forward.

State Council members stand in a hops field and listen to Erin Lizotte talk about Michigan hops.

State Council members get a chance to hear from Erin Lizotte about hop growing in Michigan.

We ended our tour at the Lake City Research Center with Jason Rowntree, Kable Thurlow and Jerry for a tour of the center and a chance to learn more about their research on forage-based livestock, potato production and bioenergy crop production. Jason is an MSU faculty member and Kable is a beef educator who conduct research and outreach at the center.

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Many council members expressed how important it was to learn more about the work we’re doing in this area of the state. It was an extremely successful trip, and I’d like to send a huge “Thank you!” out to everyone who made our visit possible.

You know, the most meaningful part for me is when we meet community members and hear how MSU Extension made a difference in their lives. Nothing beats that.

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Filed under Agriculture, Agriculture and Agribusiness, Children and Youth, Economic development, Parks, Partnerships

Ag Innovation Day focuses on soils

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Ron Bates, agriculture and agribusiness institute director for Michigan State University (MSU) Extension, sent a great event summary that I would like to share:

MSU Agriculture Innovation Day: Focus on Soils had a very successful inaugural launch August 24 at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center. The planning committee, representing a broad spectrum of Michigan agriculture and MSU Extension faculty and educators, presented a great program that over 430 participants truly appreciated.

The MSU Extension Events Management staff did a tremendous job putting together the logistics for the day, ensuring the event ran smoothly. We were fortunate to have great volunteers from across MSU Extension as well as people from private industry. Our partners in the MSU Land Management Office provided important logistics assistance along with set-up and clean-up.

The terrific speakers for Focus on Soils provided important content along with ways to use their information in practice. Featuring U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee and President Lou Anna K. Simon along with Dean Ron Hendrick, Dr. Doug Buhler and Dr. Jeff Dwyer for the lunch program was very well received.

A special feature of the lunch program honored the McCray family for 50 years of variety trial collaboration with MSU.

The event was successful due to the tremendous collaboration across our many partners.

I couldn’t have said it better myself. I was delighted to attend the event and would like to send a huge “thank you” out to the Events Management team, the presenters, MSU and Extension staff members, the volunteers and all of the participants for a successful launch!

 

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Filed under Ag Innovation Day, Agriculture and Agribusiness, Horticulture