Tag Archives: msu extension

Pre-college experiences and growth at 4-H Exploration Days

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Over 2,400 youth and adults registered to attend 4-H Exploration Days, which took place June 21–23 at Michigan State University (MSU). This fun MSU pre-college program for youth ages 11–19 is designed to help them develop important skills such as responsibility, independence, accountability, communication, problem-solving and more.

“4-H Exploration Days is the highlight of the summer for some youth,” MSU Extension educational events program coordinator Laura Potter-Niesen said. “They come to campus to get a taste of what college is like. They often are pushed to make their own decisions about time management, their preference for activities and choosing friends. It’s the first time some of the youth experience independence, and that is an important feeling for youth, especially at this age.”

Over three days, youth had the opportunity to take classes, navigate campus, stay overnight in dorms, eat in campus cafeterias and take part in activities of their choice.

This year, 4-H Exploration days featured some new courses. Laura told us that their new session on making root beer using science, technology, engineering and math skills was a hit.

“They were able to make their own root beer to take home and were able to learn about the chemistry behind the brewing process,” Laura said.

MSU Extension senior educator Debra Barrett wrote an article about another new, full session that gave youth the opportunity to create a resume and a portfolio for job interviews.

Before coming to 4-H Exploration days, youth attended a county orientation to prepare them for their experiences on campus. Kea Norrell-Aitch wrote an article about the new diversity and inclusion activity designed for these orientations this year.

Since the event “…attracts such a diverse audience, it was determined county orientations were the perfect platform to incorporate an activity that will provide 4-H members with an opportunity to increase life skills around diversity prior to attending such a large statewide program,” Kea wrote.

4-H Exploration Days hosts about 2,500 youth and adults annually, some who are new to the program and others who keep coming back every year. One participant from Luce County wrote in her evaluation:

“This is my seventh, and final, 4-H Exploration Days year. Seven years ago, as a new sixth grader, I signed up for a class and rode a bus where my toes didn’t touch the floor. Now, at the age of 18, I make my way back to MSU in the fall as a member of the class of 2021 – something 11-year-old me vowed never to do. Thank goodness for that human ability to change. I can’t thank 4-H enough. For hot, sticky nights in dorms. For the half a dozen overworn, faded T-shirts and for the friends I’ve made here. I believe in commitment. In seven years of dedication, I believe in 4-H Exploration Days, and – more importantly – I believe in myself and my ability to create change in the world.”

I’d like to take a moment to thank all of our staff and volunteers for all of your efforts to put together an outstanding and impactful program for Michigan youth.

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Filed under 4-H, Children and Youth, Uncategorized

Gearing up for Ag Innovation Day 2017

Our second annual Michigan State University (MSU) Agriculture Innovation Day is almost here. The event takes place August 24 at our Lake City Research Center. The theme this year is Focus on Forages and the Future. I hope that you’ll spread the word about this program, and I would like to invite you to join us as well. There’s a great line-up designed to deliver a cutting-edge, in-depth look at forages, livestock and the future to help farmers meet growing demands.

Here are the sessions that will be offered:

  • Making the Most of Reduced-Lignin Alfalfa in Your Operation
  • Precision is the Division in Silage
  • Expand Your Use With Double-Cropping
  • Precision Dairy Cattle Monitoring
  • Finding the Right Mix for Soil Health
  • Baleage Made Tight, Made Right
  • Creating Profitable Beef Operations by Managing Land, Livestock and People
  • Grass-Fed Beef – Research and Experience
  • Is Your Land Regenerating?

Another important element of the day is that MSU will send recruiters to the event to provide students with information about all of the degrees available through the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. We want to engage our next generation of farmers and producers, and give them the tools they need to meet the challenges they will face in the future.

We’ll also have an opportunity to hear from President Lou Anna K. Simon and Dean Ron Hendrick over the dinner portion of the event.

The event will begin at 12:30 p.m. and end around 9 p.m. For course descriptions and to register for the event, visit the Ag Innovation Day website. I hope to see you there!

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Filed under Ag Innovation Day, Agriculture and Agribusiness, Animal Science, Events, Farming, Field Days, Uncategorized

Rich connections in District 14 affect students throughout the state

We asked Brandon Schroeder, Michigan State University (MSU) Extension Sea Grant educator, to share with us about a strategic connection he has made that has strengthened his impact. Brandon’s current programming efforts involve fisheries science, biodiversity conservation, sustainable coastal tourism and Great Lakes education: working with coastal communities in northeastern Michigan to apply science-based knowledge to address Great Lakes issues locally.

“I value my Extension role in making connections and building relationships, and believe it’s an important role we play in our communities,” Brandon said.

Our questions and Brandon’s answers follow:

Will you tell us about a strategic connection you’ve made?

One successful educational partnership I’d like to highlight is with the statewide Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative (GLSI) and our leadership for the Northeast Michigan Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative (NEMIGLSI) network. These relationships reflect rich connections made between schools and educators across northeastern Michigan – and the entire state – as well as fostering greater school-community partnerships. This place-based stewardship education initiative seeks to engage youth, through their learning, in environmental stewardship projects that make a difference in the community – and so youth also are connected as community partners.

How did you go about making the connection and building relationships?

  • Seeking organizational partners, building personal relationships: Early on, we identified an opportunity (with funding) to partner with the Great Lakes Fishery Trust and an emerging statewide GLSI network. With this in mind, we sought out and met regularly to recruit potential school and community partners who had mutual interests in connecting Great Lakes and natural resource stewardship with school learning opportunities.
  • Networking in regional meetings to foster relationships: In 2006, collaborating with 4-H colleagues, we hosted and facilitated the first of many regional networking meetings inviting school and community partners who had much to contribute and to gain in this Great Lakes and natural resource education conversation. This was an educational workshop also designed to serve a networking function by facilitating relationship-building and resource sharing among schools and partners. Conversations sparked during our first regional networking meeting, now an annual tradition, became the foundation for the NEMIGLSI partnership.
  • Facilitating an engaged leadership team: A regional leadership team for the NEMIGLSI was established and helped launched the initiative. This regional team still meets regularly to coordinate our educational efforts, provide shared leadership in implementing activities and collaborate around new opportunities (and securing new resources) for our growing NEMIGLSI network. Our leadership team is more than an advisory group; they are active contributors and beneficiaries in this joint programming.
  • Sharing investment, sharing successes: Leadership team partner organizations – community, school and teacher advisors – contribute significant time, expertise and resources toward NEMIGLSI network goals. In trade, we work to ensure that network programming and successes align with their own goals and educational initiatives.

What has been the outcome of this connection and how has it influenced your work and your district?

Our NEMIGLSI network and partnership is successfully fostering a growing place-based education culture in northeastern Michigan. Since 2009, more than 19,000 students (around 20 percent of student population annually) have engaged as Great Lakes stewards and valued community leaders through NEMIGLSI. This initiative has supported more than 35 schools (290 educators) from eight counties in professional development, community partners connections and stewardship project support. Numerous NEMIGLSI student projects have directly benefited Sea Grant and partner priorities helping to conserve Lake Huron’s biodiversity, map threatened and endangered species habitat, restore native fisheries, monitor water quality and vernal pool wetlands, manage invasive species, enhance aquatic habitat, investigate marine debris and more. A published program evaluation found that students value their learning experiences as hands-on and engaging, community connected, career oriented and fun. Perhaps most exciting is that students are serving as valued community and conservation partners today – and perhaps even more in their future!

Schroeder stands in the pond with three boys and is explaining the monitoring device in the water.

Schroeder engages students in wetland ecology: invasive phragmites monitoring.

Schroeder and a boy and a girl hold up a large net to do fisheries sampling.

Schroeder fisheries sampling with students during 4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Camp

What have you learned (personally or professionally) from this connection?

  • Embrace the power in partnerships! We can all cover more ground more efficiently and effectively, and achieve deeper, richer impacts as a result of collaborative programming. Relationships and connections (or partnerships) are both organizational AND personal. They demand significant time, energy and a bit of patience to foster, and require ongoing attention, commitment and care.
  • Relationships and partner connections are equally important to our science or technical content expertise, and the educational processes and methods we use to deliver this content in communities.
  • In Extension, I have found the most vibrant and exciting projects to be at the intersections of stakeholders and opportunities that wouldn’t normally (or as regularly) cross paths. For example, connecting schools, educators and youth with Great Lakes scientists or community development partners. Many times I find that community expertise, ideas and resources abound once we have simply helped open a door for networking and relationship-building.

Thanks again to Brandon for taking time to share with us about his strategic connections. One of our great strengths in Extension is our ability to bring people, organizations and resources together to make a profound impact on our state. Each month, I’ve shared a story from each district highlighting strategic connections our colleagues have made in hopes that it will inspire all of us to reach out.

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Filed under 4-H, Conservation, Impacts, Invasive species, Partnerships, Sea Grant Extension, strategic connections

20+ year Extension partnership gears up for National Immunization Awareness Month

dna strands

As we count down to August, which is National Immunization Awareness Month, we reached out to  Dawn Contreras and Connie DeMars to highlight an important partnership and program serving Michigan medical professionals and residents. Michigan State University (MSU) Extension and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services began a partnership in 1995 as the result of a statewide need for tools and training to help raise Michigan’s immunization rate and promote better health among all residents. We formed the Physician Peer Education Program on Immunization that provides medical updates relevant to immunizations to practicing physicians and medical groups. Through this program, we provide updates on pediatrics; adult immunizations; vaccines for women’s health, influenza and HPV; and recommendations for health care personnel. All are valid for Continuing Medical Education credit.

“Since October 1 of last year, we have organized almost 70 presentations reaching over 2,000 medical professionals to answer questions,” Connie said. “Our audience has included many aspects, from hospitals to the automotive industry.”

How can we help? Connie shared that we can all help to promote our upcoming, one-hour Pediatric and Adult Influenza webinar on August 30, designed for medical professionals. It will discuss influenza rates, surveillance and coverage levels, and recommendations. It will identify strategies to improve vaccination rates. I’ve linked to the PDF of the webinar’s promotional flyer to this post below so that you can download and disseminate it.

Flu Webinar Poster

“Getting all needed immunizations is an important element of good health for many people,” Dawn said. We are honored to be a partner with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services on this long-standing program geared toward protecting the lives of Michigan residents.”

To find out more, visit our website or contact Connie at demars@anr.msu.edu.

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Filed under health, Health and Nutrition, Partnerships

Help us transform our new employee orientation

What do you remember about your first day working for Michigan State University Extension? Do you remember what type of orientation experiences you had and whether or not they were helpful? What do you wish would have been different? Anne Baker, our new learning and talent development specialist, joined us a little over a month ago, and has had her own experiences with our orientation program. One of her first projects in her mission to guide our training and development efforts is to work with us all to create meaningful orientation practices. Her first step is receiving your feedback on your orientation experiences. I hope you’ll find a moment to take her short, anonymous survey using this link: https://msu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0Uv1iZlit55mj09.

The more of us who respond, the better Anne can understand our organization’s strengths and weaknesses of welcoming new employees, so that we can transform that experience together. Thank you for your help.

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Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy recognizes MSU Extension and partners for Flint response

The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy honored the Michigan Milk Producers Association, the Kroger Co. of Michigan and Michigan State University Extension for collaborating to support families during the 2016 Flint water emergency. Because of the collaboration, food-insecure families in Flint received over 36,000 gallons of milk to help block lead absorption. For our efforts, we received an honorable mention for their U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award of Outstanding Achievement in Community Partnerships.

We appreciate the honor and hope that the national recognition goes even farther than an award we put on the shelf and feel good about. This won’t be the first or last emergency in our communities in Michigan or nationwide. We hope that the national spotlight on our partnership will give other organizations ideas of ways that they can partner to meet community needs, especially in a crisis. We hope to continue to bring the right people together to help solve complex problems, and inspire others to do the same.

To read more about how our collaboration came together, take a look at my blog post, “Getting Nutritious Milk to Flint: They Make It Look Easy.”

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Filed under Accomplishments, Awards, Flint Water

Board of Trustees select a professor with an Extension appointment for University Distinguished Professor title

Congratulations to Dr. Doug Landis on his selection by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees as a University Distinguished Professor, in recognition of his achievements in the classroom, laboratory and community. This recognition is among the highest honors that can be bestowed on a faculty member by the university. Dr. Landis is one of 10 faculty members selected who have all been recognized nationally and internationally for the importance of their teaching, research and outreach achievements.

Dr. Landis is a professor of insect ecology in the Department of Entomology and also has an Extension appointment. His research focuses on understanding the factors that influence arthropod biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. He is the author of over 140 peer-reviewed journal articles, 25 book chapters and more than 50 Extension bulletins. His Extension work focuses on the use of ecological restoration to enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services, and on invasive species ecology and management. Current areas of his outreach include the biodiversity implications of bioenergy landscapes, prairie fen and oak savanna restoration, the use of native plants to enhance ecosystem services, monarch butterfly conservation and biological control of invasive spotted knapweed.

Please join me in congratulating Doug on his University Distinguished Professor title.

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Filed under Accomplishments, Awards