Tag Archives: msu pavilion

Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute candidates to address question in public seminars

The search committee for the new Agriculture and Agribusiness (AABI) director, which includes Julie Chapin, Chris DiFonzo, Tom Guthrie, Mike Krauch, Dennis Pennington and search chair Jim Kells, has announced that the search has narrowed to two exceptional candidates: Dr. Ron Bates and Dr. Larry Gut.

As part of the selection process, the two candidates have been asked to address the following question in a 30- to 40-minute public seminar: “Share your vision for AABI and the strategy for implementing that vision.”

The schedule for the public seminars follows:

Monday, January 26
Dr. Larry Gut
10-11 a.m.: Public Seminar ‒ “The MSU Extension Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute in 2020 and How We Will Get There” (Auditorium, MSU Pavilion)
11-11:45 a.m.: Open Roundtable (Classroom A, MSU Pavilion)

Tuesday, February 3
Dr. Ron Bates
10-11 a.m.: Public Seminar ‒ “Making Our Best Better, Driving Progress in Michigan Agriculture” (Auditorium, MSU Pavilion)
11-11:45 a.m.: Open Roundtable (Classroom A, MSU Pavilion)

Feedback from all who attend the presentations at the MSU Pavilion and those who watch the recorded video presentations will be sought and appreciated. Please RSVP to attend the seminar.

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A Full Heart

Michigan State Spartan pie created by the Grand Traverse Pie Company

Michigan State Spartan pie created by the Grand Traverse Pie Company

My time at Michigan State University is nearing an end, and nothing made that clearer than the wonderful reception held for Rhonda Coon and me at the MSU Livestock Pavilion yesterday. Our hearts are full of gratitude – for the event and the many people who worked to make it special (see the enormous pies made for the occasion by Grand Traverse Pie Company), for the many messages we’ve received, for the opportunities we have had at MSU over the years, and for the many, many friends we have here. It’s hard to say anything more profound than that our hearts are full.

Oklahoma State Pistol Pete pie created by the Grand Traverse Pie Company

Oklahoma State Pistol Pete pie created by the Grand Traverse Pie Company

As a fisheries scientist, I’ve worked with a lot of different pumps over the years – in the lab, stream-side or lake-side. One of the first things you need to know about getting a pump to work is that you have to prime the pump, which means you have to get liquid into the pump chamber before it can do its job. The human heart is a pump and it needs to be primed as well. In fact, as a pump run by muscle tissues, it not only needs fluid in the chamber to be able to do its job, but it also needs to be filled so full that it stretches in order to trigger the muscle contractions that will cause the chamber to constrict and move the blood forward.

So a full heart is the starting point to getting work done. And with the fullness our hearts have from the life experiences we’ve had at MSU and from the many farewell greetings we’ve been given, there’s a lot of work we can do as we make our move to Oklahoma.

I’m not done here. I’ll be working for MSU through my last day on June 27, before I leave for a week’s vacation. You’ll still hear from me on Thursdays through MSU Extension Spotlight, and you’ll still hear from me on next Monday’s MSU Extension Update Webinar. Steve Lovejoy and I will still represent the MSUE Director’s Office in all official capacities through that date. I appreciate the opportunity to see and hear from so many of my colleagues during these final few weeks of my time at MSU. It fills and stretches my heart. Thank you for that.

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State 4-H Horse Jamboree participants develop science literacy skills

On April 16, 275 4-H’ers from across the state participated in the State 4-H Horse Jamboree at the MSU Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education. The event included Horse Judging, Hippology and the Horse Quiz Bowl. Fifty adult volunteers made the event possible in addition to animal science event coordinator Carla McLachlan, visiting instructor Taylor Fabus and Michigan State University Extension equine specialist Karen Waite.

 In Horse Judging, young people evaluate eight classes of four horses, place and answer questions about the horses, and then prepare and deliver sets of oral reasons to defend their placings.

 According to Karen, “It’s a tremendous way to develop critical thinking, confidence and public speaking skills with the horse as a tool to excite youth.”

 In Hippology, young people in the junior division, ages 9 to 13, participate in a variety of equine-related activities including a written exam, a slide test and identification stations. Senior members, ages 14 to 19, participate in those same activities and also judge two classes, and develop and deliver solutions to a prepared and a spontaneous equine-related problem.

 Horse Quiz Bowl is an equine game show in which youth test their knowledge about horse care and management in a team format.

 All three of these events provide educational opportunities for youth regardless of their learning style preference.

 And Karen says, “They have the chance to develop and improve their science literacy without really knowing that they are learning about science. They just think they are learning about horses!”

 That kind of hands-on learning, driven primarily by their natural curiosity, is the basis for success of our 4-H program in helping youth to prepare for successful life as adults.

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Risk management plan works for horse show participant

Everybody in the MSU Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education gasped in fear the morning of August 7 when a horse got spooked, reared up and landed on its owner. Later in the day, those same people breathed a sigh of relief when the owner, a young woman participating in the State 4-H Horse Show, returned to the pavilion with just a few bruises, a couple of scrapes and one big smile.

Though we do everything we can to minimize hazards to both adults and youth who work around animals, occasional accidents do happen. That’s why we have a risk management plan in place. I’m happy to report our plan worked perfectly—EMTs and veterinarians were on site to ensure that both human and horse were cared for quickly. The young woman was immediately transported to the hospital where she was treated and released.

Special thanks to Karen Waite, MSU Extension equine specialist, for calmly taking charge of the situation, and to Taylor Tenlen, an MSU graduate student, who served as spokesperson. Two Lansing area television stations were on site when the accident occurred, and both reported on the incident by telling the story about how MSU staff members reacted quickly and efficiently to ensure the health and safety of everyone involved. Planning ahead and then following the plan turned this into a positive outcome for the youth, her family and her horse. Congratulations to the MSUE equine team!

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Filed under 4-H, Agriculture