Tag Archives: northwest michigan horticultural research station

Local cherries and beer: The impact of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station

Nikki Rothwell, coordinator of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station and a Michigan State University Extension specialist, was recently highlighted on Greening of the Great Lakes, hosted by Kirk Heinze. She was also written about in the MLive article “Michigan State University Research and Michigan Agriculture Are Making a Global Impact.”

The coverage went into detail about how the station assists commercial fruit growers in the “fruit belt” of Northwest Michigan.

When describing the impact of the station on the area, Nikki said, “It’s the hub of activity, research and information for the Michigan grower community.”

One of the major areas of research is hops production.

According to Nikki in her interview, “The major market for local hops is microbreweries. Locality is something consumers really embrace and there’s something about knowing that the hops used to make your beer were grown by a local farmer.”

With the help of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station, local growers are selling to local microbreweries, which keeps the entire production cycle local. The microbrewery market is growing as well, because many Michiganders appreciate the nature of supporting the local producer.

Hops are not the only crops being researched by the station – Rothwell spoke about the station’s contribution to the growth of the market for Michigan cherries across the country: specifically the Hungarian Balaton cherry.

“There are markets in New York City and Chicago with people from Eastern European descent that really miss their cherries from their homeland. There’s a company that trucks our Balaton cherries from northern Michigan all the way back to those markets and they get sold like hot cakes,” she said.

To see the full article and hear the interview, visit “Michigan State University Research and Michigan Agriculture Are Making a Global Impact” on MLive.

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Horticulture educator featured in northern Michigan magazine

I’d like to call your attention to an article that appeared in Traverse, Northern Michigan’s Magazine.

The article highlights Dr. Nikki Rothwell, district Michigan State University Extension horticulture educator and coordinator of the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center in Traverse City. The author Jeff Smith does a fantastic job of capturing the essence of Dr. Rothwell’s work and the center’s role in the lives of growers.

Mr. Smith describes a class Dr. Rothwell leads on keeping orchards free of fungi, bacteria and invading insects. An entomologist, Dr. Rothwell shares her expertise with local growers, sharing both her vast knowledge and engaging personality. She’s involved in the long-term vision for the center as well as the immediate concern of the grower.

The article gets across the value of the horticultural center as “the educational center and social hub of Northwest Michigan’s orchard industry.”

It’s well worth your time to read the entire article: http://www.mynorth.com/My-North/June-2013/Northern-Michigans-Next-Gen-Farm-Girl-Nikki-Rothwell/

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MSU Extension faculty and staff featured in national news on the tart cherry industry

Michigan’s tart cherry industry has taken a hit due to the unseasonable weather this spring. An Aug. 16 PBS Newshour feature on the subject included expert information from Michigan State University Extension faculty and staff. Jeffrey Andresen, associate professor in the Department of Geography, and Nikki Rothwell, district horticulturist and Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station coordinator, lent their expertise to the piece along with retired educator Jim Nugent and District 3 Advisory Council member Pat McGuire. Watch the video here:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/climate-change/july-dec12/cherries_08-16.html.

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Extension educators and specialists receive awards at NACAA conference

Two weeks ago in an Aug. 11 Spotlight article, I told you about the tremendous involvement of our Michigan State University Extension colleagues in the National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA) and their Annual Meeting and Professional Conference. I promised you that I would describe the awards that were presented to these MSU Extension professionals at the conference Aug. 7–11 in Overland, Kan., and although it’s a week later than planned, I’m making good on that promise.

 Two Extension educators in the Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute earned the NACAA Distinguished Service Award for educators with more than ten years of service: Robert Bricault, Extension educator in Washtenaw County, and Warren Schauer, Extension educator in the Upper Peninsula.

 During 19 years in Extension, Robert Bricault served as an educator in consumer and commercial horticulture, and natural resources in southeastern Michigan. Bob worked to reduce phosphorus impacts on local rivers through a soil-testing initiative and helped develop an educational resource notebook on the emerald ash borer for each county in Michigan. He provides specialized training in diagnosing landscape problems.

 As business management educator, Warren Schauer served most of his 32-year Extension career delivering farm financial management and agricultural educational programs to clientele in the Upper Peninsula and northeastern Michigan. Significant programming includes farm financial analysis, business planning, estate planning, livestock marketing and wind energy programs. Warren has also been involved in the Agriculture for Tomorrow Conference, Annie’s Project, U.P. Youth Market Livestock recordkeeping project, Bay de Noc Gardening Conference, Master Gardener, and farm financial management seminars in the Ukraine, Africa and the eastern Caribbean.

 Tom Guthrie, Extension educator in Jackson County, received the NACAA Achievement Award given to educators with less than ten years of service. As a member of the MSU Extension Pork Area of Expertise team, Tom is responsible for developing statewide accessibility to swine management educational programming, which also includes environmental issues. Tom’s major educational programming initiatives include swine production management, utilization of Distiller’s Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) in swine rations, environmental sustainability of pork operations and pork industry assurance programs. Tom also works with youth pork producers across the state.

 National finalists for “Search for Excellence in Crop Production” for “Sustainable Hops Production in the Great Lakes Region” were Robert Sirrine, Extension educator in the Greening Michigan Institute; Erin Lizotte, agriculture and agribusiness Extension educator at the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station (NWMHRS); and Nikki Rothwell, district horticulturalist and NWMHRS coordinator. Through the program, the group of educators strives toward the goal of providing potential hops growers with an accurate assessment of the costs, challenges and opportunities for small-scale hops production in the Great Lakes Region by providing science-based growing and marketing information. The program has made significant progress toward this goal through grant-funded on-farm research, brewer surveys, educational programming, field days, and marketing and outreach. A significant investment in program evaluations has served to ensure that programming efforts remain relevant and timely. Results demonstrate increased knowledge in hops production and processing, and confidence in growing and marketing hops. Small-scale hops production has and will continue to provide economic development opportunities in Michigan and the surrounding Great Lakes Region. 

 Robert Sirrine; Cheryl Peters, Extension specialist; Nikki Rothwell; Erin Lizotte; Stan Moore, Extension educator; and Duke Elsner, Extension educator; were state winners for “Search for Excellence in Young, Beginner, or Small Farmers/Ranchers” for “Northwest Michigan New FARM Program.” It’s becoming harder for young people to enter and stay in the farming profession due to lack of farm transfers, the decline of traditional processing markets, residential development, increasing land costs and other financial difficulties. The Northwest Michigan New FARM (Farmer Assistance and Resource Management) Program is designed to assist beginning farmers, increase economic viability, maintain and enhance environmental stewardship and conserve northwestern Michigan’s rural character. Forty beginning farmers from northwestern Michigan’s five-county area were selected to participate in this comprehensive two-year program. A series of eleven workshops and four educational trips will educate these young farmers with the ultimate goal of a future of viable and sustainable agriculture in northwestern Michigan.

 Tom Dudek, senior Extension educator, and Charles Gould, Extension educator, were poster presentations finalists for “Determining Nutrient Removal Rates for Selected Herbaceous Perennial Crops.” Data generated from the study presented will be used by growers to comply with Michigan’s Right to Farm guidelines with respect to phosphorus applications to their farms.

 Duke Elsner and Mogens Nielsen, MSU adjunct curator, were poster presentations finalists for “Encouraging Citizen Science Activity to Obtain Data on Butterfly Distribution in Michigan.” Mogens’ book “Michigan Butterflies & Skippers” (E2675) was first published in 1999. Although he gathered information through many decades of personal study and examination of museum specimens, county distribution data appeared to be incomplete. Readers were asked to become “citizen scientists” and examine their personal collections in an effort to gain complete and accurate county distribution data. The data collected from this process was extensive enough to remove one species from the “special concern” list in the state.

 Many of our colleagues won communications awards.

 Phil Durst, Extension dairy educator, was state winner and regional finalist for an audio recording. Phil wrote the “Dairy Moosings” podcasts, which were reviewed by researchers. Phil and Stan Moore recorded, edited and produced the podcasts. You can find them on the MSU Dairy Team website at http://dairyteam.msu.edu/. The podcasts are published in Libsyn (http://dairymoosings.libsyn.com/webpage) in a library of Dairy Moosings podcasts and are available for RSS feeds. The podcasts, “Bovine Leukosis Virus: More Bark Than Bite?” and “High Production and Reproduction: Do the Two Mix?” present current dairy management research information in an interesting and adaptable format, accessible when and where producers want it.

 Robert Sirrine and Annette Kleinschmit, Leelanau County Extension administrative assistant, were state winners for a program promotional piece. Twenty promotional pieces were displayed at area Extension offices, grocery stores and other locales to promote the 2010 Hops Field Day and Tour. The event was also publicized on a weekly radio program and sent out via email and mail in a monthly agriculture newsletter. As a result of this promotion and marketing, 53 participants enrolled in the session.

 Duke Elsner was a state winner for a feature story that appeared in the Traverse City Record-Eagle. Field crop production is often overlooked in the Grand Traverse Bay region where most media coverage focuses on cherry and wine grape production. In the summer of 2010, it became clear that the region’s field corn crop was going to be at record-setting levels. Duke called attention to this agricultural achievement by preparing a feature article about the types of corn grown in the country, the numerous uses for corn and the significance of corn production in the local area.

 Extension educators Diane Brown-Rytlewski and Bruce Mackellar were state winners and national finalists for a team newsletter that is distributed to commercial fruit, vegetable and field crop growers in Berrien County and other parts of southwestern Michigan. Copies are printed and mailed to a list of more than 500 subscribers, and the publication is also available via email or at the Extension office. Created three to four times per year, the newsletter provides timely meeting notifications and other information pertinent to growers and others involved with commercial crop production.

 Dennis Pennington, Extension educator, was state winner and regional finalist for a bioenergy website, developed to address a key gap in delivering information to farmers and Extension educators. Existing MSU bioenergy websites focused on current research and grants but did not include general information about what bioenergy is, what the potential crops are, and how these crops can be processed into energy. This site conveys this general information as well as current results from applied research, national policy objectives, economics of production and links to external resources. The site is also used to share speaker presentations from various events. Visit the website at http://bioenergy.msu.edu/.

 Erin Lizotte, Nikki Rothwell and Extension educators Phil Tocco and Jane Herbert were state winners and regional finalists for a learning module. As farmers continue to struggle with GAPs (good agricultural practices) and new food safety standards, it has become necessary to train growers step by step about food safety. A Web series was launched designed to get growers one step closer to GAP certification. A compilation of fact sheets, video clips and a GAP Manual Template were bundled on a CD (the learning module), and a graphical user interface was developed to guide producers with a limited access to the Web.

 Phil Tocco was a state winner for a video recording, which is part of the Web series described above.

 Phil Tocco and Jane Herbert were state winners for a fact sheet. Food safety has become a significant issue among produce growers in Michigan. Of particular concern has been the lack of a uniform action threshold among auditing agencies concerning irrigation water quality. Working with water quality educators and specialists in Michigan, the food safety Extension group vetted two standards in use within the U.S. relating to irrigation water, then wrote a fact sheet to aid growers in adopting a standard. Drafted in August of 2010, the factsheet has been distributed online and in various grower meetings to at least 150 individuals.

 Congratulations to all of our winners! Our colleagues in NACAA do a great job of modeling creativity, innovation and teamwork.

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Rapid response relieves grower

Michigan State University Extension District 3 coordinator Patrick Cudney called my attention to a recent letter to the editor in the Traverse City Record-Eagle from Rick Cross, a berry grower in Northport. It seems that Rick had a problem that was quickly solved on a weekend in less than 24 hours by Erin Lizotte, Extension educator at the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station, and Annemiek Schilder, associate professor in MSU’s Department of Plant Pathology. Says district coordinator Cudney, “This type of rapid and needed diagnostics is what makes MSUE the invaluable resource we are.”

Click on this link to read the letter to the editor: http://record-eagle.com/letters/x91133728/Letters-to-the-Editor-08-09-2010

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Coordinated teamwork leads to successful cherry event

July 4–8, the National Cherry Festival and Michigan State University Extension (MSUE) presented Cherry Connection. Attendees were invited to visit the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station (NWMHRS), part of the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) operated by MSUE in Traverse City. Besides guided orchard tours, there were exhibits and samples of the newest cherry products and technology inside the station. Fun activities for the kids included a petting zoo, hands-on experiments, a poster-coloring contest and many other activities.

 Jennifer Berkey, MSUE Grand Traverse and Leelanau counties educator, says that more than 2,400 people attended Cherry Connection. In fact, they had a record turnout on Monday and Tuesday when more than 600 people attended each day. In a survey, 95 percent of participants stated they will purchase a locally produced cherry product in the near future. Ninety-eight percent stated that they learned a new fact about cherries or a new use for cherries. Attendees cited the orchard tour and cherry taste testing as favorite event activities. Looks like the staff met their goal of showing people where cherries come from while having a little fun along the way.

 You’ll learn some fun facts about cherries and about the Cherry Connection when you view this video from Northern Michigan’s Fox 32 News on the 9&10 News website: http://www.9and10news.com/category/story/?id=238899&cID=1.

 And says Dr. Nikki Rothwell, MSUE district horticulturalist and NWMHRS coordinator, after viewing the video, “We should recruit the 4-H kid to do our PR work!”

 4-H kids help out at the Cherry Connection each day. They bring their animals for the petting zoo, which this year included a horse, a steer, rabbits, chickens and llamas. They also sold dried and chocolate-covered cherries and cherry sodas. Barb Duvall, Leelanau County Extension educator, did a fantastic job of helping coordinate the kids and the petting zoo portion of the event.

 The Cherry Connection is a great example of coordinated teamwork involving the MAES, MSUE, 4-H, the cherry festival and the cherry industry.

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