Tag Archives: terry gibb

Celebrating our Distinguished Academic Staff

Last week I had the privilege of attending the MSU Extension Reception for our Distinguished Academic Staff Award recipients: Phil Durst, Terry Gibb and Kurt Schindler. As I mentioned in an earlier blog post, this year Extension cleaned house, taking home three of the four DAS awards given. It was great to come together with our award winners, their families and colleagues to celebrate at the Kellogg Center.

Group photo with our MSU Extension award recipients. Left to right: Jeff Dwyer, Kurt Schindler, Terry Gibb, Phillip Durst, Patrick Cudney.

Group photo with our MSU Extension award recipients. Left to right: Jeff Dwyer, Kurt Schindler, Terry Gibb, Phillip Durst, Patrick Cudney. Photo courtesy of ANR Communications.

It was such a privilege to be able to get to know more about our distinguished colleagues and their outstanding work.

As I promised in the January 2016 issue of Spotlight, here is the link to the Michigan State University news release highlighting our award winners’ accomplishments:

2016 Distinguished Academic Staff Awards

As I listened to each nominator speak about Phil, Terry and Kurt, I realized how much Extension staff members rely on each other and how important mentoring is in this organization.

I would like to thank Betsy Braid, Megghan Honke Seidel and the rest of our Events Management team, and Terri Badgley for a great event. I would also like to express my gratitude again to Phil, Terry and Kurt for their outstanding service.

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MSU Extension educators will receive three out of four Distinguished Academic Staff awards for 2015

Congratulations to Phil Durst, Terry Gibb and Kurt Schindler for winning the MSU Distinguished Academic Staff award for 2015. I was thrilled to hear that three out of four awards will be given to MSU Extension educators this year. What a testament to the work that you do and the impact that you have! I’ve done a little digging, and I found that in the 17 years the university has given this award, MSU Extension has had at least one award winner 15 of those years. Most of those years, two educators have been recognized. In 2010, we even had four winners! It is such an honor for me to come into this organization filled with passionate, dedicated people making a difference in Michigan.

In my February blog, I will post the links to the press releases that highlight the individual efforts of our well-deserving winners.

Please join us to celebrate their awards on Tuesday, February 9, from 11:30-2 p.m. in the Big Ten C Room of Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center. The program will begin around 12:15 p.m. and a light lunch/refreshments will be served. Please RSVP using this link: RSVP for Awards Reception, by Sunday, February 7. We hope that many of you will be able to join us to celebrate Phil’s, Terry’s and Kurt’s accomplishments.

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MSU Extension staff member named CANR Staffer of the Month

Betsy Braid, Michigan State University Extension educational program coordinator in Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) Event Services, has received the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Staff Advisory Committee September 2015 Administrative/Technical Staffer of the Month award.

The award goes to a member of the CANR support staff who has done something special or noteworthy within his or her college or unit.

Steven Safferman, associate professor in the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and Bindu Bhakta and Terry Gibb, Extension educators in the Greening Michigan Institute, nominated Betsy. The three recognized her for her enthusiasm and efficiency in taking on the coordination of the MSU Extension Comprehensive Onsite Wastewater Management Education Program. They believe her tackling this challenging program shows the “spirit of MSUE.”

Congratulations to Betsy and thanks to Steven, Bindu and Terry for nominating her.

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Extension connects on ballot issues

In an article in last week’s Spotlight, I drew your attention to Bulletin GE 49, written by Michigan State University Extension specialist Claire Layman. The bulletin supplies non-partisan objective information allowing Michigan residents to make informed decisions on the six proposals appearing on the ballot Nov. 6.

Besides writing the bulletin, Claire was busy using technology to educate further about the proposals. With help from ANR Communications multimedia production team leader Steve Evans, Claire led two Adobe Connect sessions on campus with leading experts on the ballot issues. On Oct. 22, the group hosted fora, reaching out to four locations: Harrisville, Lawrence, Sault Ste. Marie and Wayne. On Oct. 24, the fora involved five locations: Clinton Township, Flint, Hastings, Houghton and Traverse City.

Attendees read over the bulletin and watched three pre-recorded video interviews with policy experts who covered both sides of the proposal issues. Afterward, they asked questions of the experts through Adobe Connect.

Experts included MSU Extension specialist and professor of economics Eric Scorsone, professor in the MSU School of Human Resources and Labor Relations Peter Berg, marketing economist in the MSU Product Center Bill Knudson and senior associate director of the Land Policy Institute Mark Wyckoff.

A total of 149 people participated in the fora with the most attending at Harrisville in Alcona County with 53 participants.

Extension educators hosting the forums included Darren Bagley, Ann Chastain, Terry Gibb, Ginger Hentz, Brad Neumann, Julie Pioch, Bethany Prykucki, Mike Schira, Bonnie Witchner-Zoia and Richard Wooten. Terry Gibb helped write Bulletin GE 49 and helped to organize the overall registration.

In addition, Extension specialist Georgia Peterson helped out by wrangling questions as they came in one evening from the four live sites. She quickly figured out the best method to do so within Adobe Connect.

Organizations that partnered with us in this endeavor included the League of Women Voters, the Lake Superior State University Political Science Club, the Northwest Council of Michigan Governments and the District 13 Extension Council. Partner organizations served to recruit and market the forums, and served as table facilitators at small group discussions.

Claire reports that all evaluations have not been tabulated yet but those that have come in so far have been generally very positive. In Alcona County, 82 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “Because of tonight’s event, I am better informed to make decisions on Michigan’s proposals in the upcoming election.” One hundred percent of Alcona County respondents agreed or strongly agreed that events such as the fora are valuable for our democracy, and 79 percent of them agreed or strongly agreed that they’d like to be a part of similar events.

Associate professor Luke Reese has been instrumental in leading us in the use of Adobe Connect technology. He continues to offer monthly online workshops and is largely responsible for our organizational competency in Adobe Connect meetings and webinars.

Thanks to Claire for making innovative use of technology and to Luke and Steve for continuing to teach, lead and support us in technology efforts. And thanks to our Extension educators for hosting and our partners for their contribution to the events.

We have further signs that people look to us when they want to make informed decisions based on expert opinion. As of Oct. 31, we had more than 400 page views for the forum event listings and nearly 1,400 page views on Extension educator Terry Gibb’s article “November Ballot Issues Could Mean Changes for Michigan Residents.”

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Extension helps educate public about Detroit consent agreement

Helping the public and our stakeholders understand the issues that directly affect their quality of life is one of the pinnacles of MSUE. And one of the biggest and best recent examples of this is Extension’s work in educating the public about the recent Detroit consent agreement.

MSUE Public Policy and State Government Team members Eric Scorsone, James Ribbron, Terry Gibb, Nickie Bateson and Richard Wooten are working on a series of Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) bulletins that examine the complicated structure of the agreement, the functions and powers of many key players and context for key date, terms and issues.

The first two bulletins, an FAQ and a follow-up FAQ, were linked to and written about in MSU Extension News articles, a quick and easy way for Extension staffers to push out information to the public quickly and effectively. It is a great example of Extension taking a fast-evolving issue and mobilizing quickly to leverage the wealth of knowledge and experience its educators and specialists have on an important topic.

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MSUE contributes to the award-winning Michigan Water Withdrawal Assessment Tool (WWAT)

The Michigan Water Withdrawal Assessment Tool (WWAT) recently won two national awards. The application won the Outstanding Achievement Award for 2010 from the Renewable Natural Resources Foundation. It also was one of four innovations to receive the State Program Innovation Award from the Environmental Council of States.

 What’s the WWAT? The WWAT is an application designed to estimate the likely impact of a water withdrawal on nearby streams and rivers. Use of the WWAT is required of anyone proposing to make a new or increased large quantity withdrawal (more than 70 gallons per minute) from Michigan waters, including all groundwater and surface water sources, prior to beginning the withdrawal.

 Why the WWAT? In coordination with the signing of the Great Lakes Compact, Michigan and the other Great Lakes states were charged with the mission of developing a statewide program to manage and regulate new and expanding large water withdrawals. Michigan responded by enacting new laws, several of which called for the development and use of a Water Withdrawal Assessment Process to manage large quantity water withdrawals. Using science as the basis for policy development, a team of scientists and agency personnel developed the process to assist individuals in determining if their proposed large capacity water withdrawal will likely cause an adverse resource impact to a nearby river or stream.

 Who’s responsible for the WWAT? That’s a complex question since so many people and organizations worked together to make the WWAT a reality. A number of individuals were associated with the development and “roll out” of the WWAT including members of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, and scientists from the University of Michigan and others. A Legislated Ground Water Advisory Committee worked on this effort for several years. Our own Michigan State University Institute of Water Research (IWR) has played a key role in several steps of the legislation and assessment process. Prior to the legislation on the Water Withdrawal Assessment Process being passed, Jon Bartholic, director of the IWR, provided testimony to the state Senate Natural Resources and Environmental Policy committee and worked with Senator Patty Birkholz’s committee on public hearings throughout the state. Jeremiah Asher, IWR, created the Web-based tool. Following the development of the tool, David Lusch, senior research specialist, MSU Center for Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Science and IWR, and Jeremiah Asher were the two main presenters at a series of workshops throughout the state. Lois Wolfson and Ruth Kline-Robach, Michigan State University Extension state water quality coordinators, organized and evaluated the meetings.

 Lyndon Kelley, MSU Extension, and Steve Miller, Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, organized and presented another series of workshops. Dave Hamilton and Frank Ruswick, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and Paul Seelbach, Department of Natural Resources, provided outside assistance for these workshops

 In addition, MSU Extension educators were hard at work presenting other educational meetings and programs. Roberta Dow held a meeting on the WWAT as part of the MAEAP Phase I. Lyndon Kelley and Christina Curell presented WWAT information as part of four separate Extension education programs. Others who held meetings on the tool included Terry Gibb and Bindu Bhakta.

Jane Herbert, MSU Extension at Kellogg Biological Station, and Luke Reese, Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at MSU, organized a webinar with David Lusch as the speaker.
 
Paul Seelbach, formerly with Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment and Jane Herbert developed a bulletin of frequently asked questions (Extension Bulletin WQ60) concerning the Water Withdrawal Assessment Process, Considering Aquatic Ecosystems: The Basis for Michigan’s New Water Withdrawal Assessment Process.

So as you can see, it took a considerable team across multiple agencies and with a variety of expertise to make this award-winning process and application possible.

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