Tag Archives: terry mclean

Congratulations to our 2017 Distinguished Academic Staff Award winners

Tuesday we celebrated our Distinguished Academic Staff (DSA) Award winners, Jordan Burroughs and Terry McLean. The DSA honors the outstanding achievements of professionals who serve Michigan State University (MSU) in advising, curriculum development, outreach, extension, research and teaching. Up to four DSA awards are given annually, and these awards provide university wide recognition and reward to individuals with outstanding careers that demonstrate long-term excellence.

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Jordan Burroughs and her family. Photo credit: MSU Extension Communications Team.

Jordan, an outreach specialist in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, works closely with the wildlife community of interest in Michigan and has created innovative and effective education and stakeholder support programs. She is also the nation’s first Boone and Crockett Club Extension specialist and is known for the Gourmet Gone Wild and Catch and Cook programs, which she helped to develop and expand.

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Jeff Dwyer, Terry McLean and her family. Photo credit: MSU Extension Communications Team.

Terry is a community food systems educator based in MSU Extension District 9. During the Flint water emergency, Terry mobilized MSU resources to respond to community needs through collaborating with partners and colleagues. She is also a founding member of edible flint, a community gardening and urban ag network that helps revitalize communities and improve access to healthy food and revitalization. Lastly, Terry has provided leadership and training opportunities for the Genesee Master Gardener Volunteer Program for 13 years.

Read more about Jordan and Terry, as well as the other award winners, in MSU’s 2017 Distinguished Academic Staff Awards press release. Congratulations again to Jordan and Terry, and thank you for your service.

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Strategic connections with local nonprofits in District 9

Terry McLean, Michigan State University (MSU) Extension community food systems educator in District 9, has a strategic connection with the edible flint network. Edible flint is a local nonprofit organization formed in 2009 that is made up of residents, government representatives and agencies, health institutions, other nonprofits, educators and advocates for social change, working together to improve access to healthy food through community and economic development and education in Flint, Michigan.

Terry is the point of contact for the organization, serves on edible flint’s leadership board and is a co-lead for one of its five workgroups.

Edible flint’s programs have supported 1,068 food gardens in the city of Flint, 111 of which are community gardens, which have contributed to blight elimination and healthy food access for Flint residents,” Terry said. “Collaboration and convening community partners and organizations has been the strategy to support this work.”

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After the state of emergency was declared in Flint in January of 2016, edible flint reached 4,684 residents through presentations, programs and events, and recruited 76 community volunteers who performed 1,415 volunteer hours for edible flint programs and outreach work.

But their important work is only beginning.

“Through edible flint we’ve secured $197,334 in 2016 through six grants — two renewals and four new water emergency-related grants,” Terry said. “Through a strategic planning process that was made possible by a Michigan Department of Agriculture grant this summer, we’ve identified steps for transitioning from the initial lead crisis response to a sustainable recovery program that increases the local food production capacity in the Flint region while incorporating the evaluation’s stakeholder feedback in the strategic plan’s implementation.”

When we asked Terry what she had learned from these important strategic connections, she spoke about how MSU Extension is a trusted partner and “backbone organization” that has contributed to the success of edible flint. I think she identified a key strength of our organization: our ability to be a backbone in our communities across Michigan. We have a unique role to play when needs are identified or when emergencies occur. By bringing together and working with all of the supportive agencies and organizations in our communities, we can be the backbone of a network that moves Michigan forward.

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Filed under Flint Water, strategic connections, Uncategorized

Thoughts on my second month as director

The focus on Flint in recent weeks and the need to address important nutrition, child development, public health and community infrastructure issues has given us the opportunity to remind folks that MSU Extension has been in Flint for 100 years. We will be there for the next 100 years, and can be an important part of developing and implementing solutions that change lives. Your colleagues are making a difference. Deanna East is helping to coordinate the Michigan State University response in Flint. Eric Scorsone and the recently announced MSU Extension Center for Local Government Finance and Policy are engaging local officials and testifying before the State Legislature. Erin Powell, Cathy Newkirk and many others are addressing nutrition issues on the ground. Terry McLean and the Edible Flint crew are working closely with the Food Bank Council of Michigan, the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan and state officials to ensure that food is distributed in areas of greatest need. This is important work that underscores the breadth of our collective experience, the ability to respond quickly and the importance of partnerships that you have built over decades.

The critical role that MSU Extension is playing in Flint is replicated in every community throughout Michigan. But, seven weeks into my new job as part of your team, it is already clear that not enough people know who we are. Moreover, those who do know us well are not always familiar with the breadth and depth of MSU Extension programming. I met recently with an agricultural commodity CEO, for example, who indicated that labor force issues were among his biggest industry concerns. As we talked, it became clear that, although his interactions over many years had been primarily with our Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute (for obvious reasons), many programs in the Greening Michigan, Children and Youth, and Health and Nutrition Institutes would be potentially valuable resources to him in recruiting and retaining valued employees.

We often use a slide when describing “Who is MSU Extension?” that includes the following bullets:

  • Faculty and Academic Staff on Campus
  • Extension Educators and Senior Extension Educators
  • 4-H Program Coordinators
  • Program Instructors, Program Associates, Program Assistants
  • Support Staff Members, on and off campus; MSU or county employees
  • Funded by County, State and Federal Resources

While these statements are accurate and descriptive, what if, instead, we said things like:

  • Unparalleled statewide health education delivery system.
  • Business start-up, tech transfer and product development expertise.
  • Serve schools statewide; capable of gathering more than 2,000 kids and their families for a single event.
  • Rapid response for agriculture, human health and other emergencies, such as the current Flint water crisis.
  • Future funding growth to come from building partnerships!

You can help me in at least two important ways.

  1. Don’t hesitate to tell people about the great work you do, and add in a bit about what your colleagues do in many areas across the entire state. If you aren’t aware of all MSU Extension programs, the website is a good place to start.
  2. Help us to find even more creative ways to describe what we do and outlets for sharing that information with the world. What descriptive statements would you add to this list to describe “Who is MSU Extension?”

Consider browsing through our public value statements occasionally to refresh your memory about how all of your colleagues’ work makes a difference in Michigan. We work for an amazing organization. By working together we can ensure that more people understand how we can help positively change their lives, communities and businesses.

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Filed under Agriculture and Agribusiness, Children and Youth, Economic development, Financial education, Flint Water, Food, health, Health and Nutrition, Nutrition, Resources, Youth development

Update on Flint

MSU Extension is right in the middle of the efforts to reach the people of Flint with the resources they need. Our response there shows how nimble and responsive our team is in times of crisis. For example, HNI and CYI teams have developed fact sheets on how to Fight Lead With Nutrition and Fight Lead Affects With Learning and Play. These resources, and others, are not only valuable in Flint, but also in other areas of the state that have high lead levels.

In addition to these and other very specific lead-related resources, your colleagues have modified other programming to fit the needs of residents as they deal with lead exposure.

Some highlights of what your colleagues accomplished in January alone follow. MSU Extension has helped more than 2,100 people through programs, participation in events and partnerships.

Jennifer Skornicka and her team put on a 4-H information display at a Family Fun Night and Lead Testing event at Eisenhower Elementary that reached 400 young people and 285 adults. At this event, families received Molina Foundation books and the new Nutrition & Lead recipe information booklets. These booklets have become an important resource, and we’ve distributed more than 6,000 copies to 23 organizations that will further distribute of them. Hurley Children’s Hospital has an additional 2,500 booklets to distribute to their patients. Julia Darnton, Terry McLean and Erin Powell are working with ongoing programs in growing and accessing healthy food.

Photo of a Cooking demonstration at the Eastern Market using ingredients that are high in iron, calcium and Vitamin D.

Cooking demonstration at the Eastern Market using ingredients that are high in iron, calcium and Vitamin C. Photo credit: ANR Communications.

102 people have attended food and nutrition demonstrations featuring recipes that block lead absorption at the Flint Farmers’ Market. These are in addition to many other programs designed to meet needs in the community.

Because all eyes are on Flint and our work there, we’ve been getting a lot of attention from MSU President Simon and others. In her February 10, 2016, State of the University speech, President Simon was very complimentary about the work of MSU Extension in Flint. Everything we do to help the people of Flint elevates our reputation throughout the state and on campus. People are becoming aware of the importance of having Extension folks rooted in the communities that they serve. Every day is a reminder for me of how fortunate I am to be part of the MSU Extension team.

You might be wondering how you can help and what resources we have developed. You also might be getting calls from concerned residents in your communities. Links to several important resources for you and anyone else who is concerned about Flint and about nutrition and the water in their own communities follow.

  • Fight Lead Exposure The new MSU Extension page with links to MSU Extension news articles and educational resources about lead.
  • MSU Pediatric Public Health Fund  This MSU fund will support a new effort to find and evaluate interventions for the children of Flint affected by lead exposure.
  • Flint Volunteer Reception Center The center is designed as a central point of contact for all volunteers and those needing volunteers in Flint.

When people call your office looking for a place to get their drinking water tested, direct them to the county health department first. (The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services provides a Local Health Department Map.) If the health department doesn’t offer that service, callers can order a water test kit from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality for $18 by calling 517-335-8184.

To learn more about Flint and what people are coming together to achieve there, visit one of the pages listed here:

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Filed under 4-H, Children and Youth, Flint Water, Food, Health and Nutrition, Nutrition

MSU Extension hosts FoodCorps service members, supports farm-to-school program

Childhood hunger and childhood obesity may seem to be opposite problems, but both may be caused by a lack of healthy food. Schools may be just the place to help prevent both problems.

FoodCorps is a nationwide team of AmeriCorps leaders who collaborate with communities to make schools a healthier place for kids to eat, learn and grow. FoodCorps aims to let all children know what healthy food is, where it comes from and how it keeps them healthy. In the process of helping children, FoodCorps service members gain experience for future careers in the food and health services.

In this new program year, FoodCorps has 205 service members placed with over 500 schools in 17 states and Washington, D.C. Michigan is one of those states.

Michigan State University Extension in Grand Traverse County is a local FoodCorps Michigan service site. Our organization hosts FoodCorps service member Mikaela Taylor who along with Stephanie Cumper, hosted by the Groundwork Center for Resilient Communities (formerly the Michigan Land Use Institute), is busy building partnerships with food service workers, farmers, school administrators, teachers, parents and community members. They are using a team approach to support farm-to-school programming in Grand Traverse and Benzie counties.

MSU Extension Health and Nutrition Institute educator Sarah Eichberger serves as the site supervisor for Mikaela at the Traverse City FoodCorps service site. FoodCorps service members have been in Traverse City since the founding of the program five years ago. This is the first year that Groundworks and MSU Extension Grand Traverse County are working jointly to host and provide leadership to service members.

The two service members and their service sites took part in the September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance, partnering with the Father Fred Foundation to organize a garden restoration project that will provide the Father Fred food pantry in Traverse City with fresh local produce.

In addition, MSU Extension hosts a FoodCorps service site in Chippewa County. MSU Extension Greening Michigan Institute educator Michelle Walk supervises FoodCorps service member Jeannette Cushway.

Terry McLean, MSU Extension Greening Michigan Institute educator has served as the host site supervisor for the FoodCorps Michigan program on behalf of the Community Food Systems work team since 2013.

Terry says that the FoodCorps National Service Program touches all of the core work areas of MSU Extension through teaching school-aged children about healthy food, encouraging healthy eating habits, assisting in development of school gardens and sourcing healthy food for school cafeterias.

In addition, FoodCorps service members get back what they give.

“As service members perform a year of paid public service alongside educators and community leaders in high-need schools across Michigan communities, leadership skills emerge, preparing them for a range of future careers in education, food and health services,” Terry said.

Read this MSU Extension News article by Sarah Eichberger, which tells more about the work of FoodCorps and the two service members working in Grand Traverse and Benzie counties: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/northwest_michigan_welcomes_two_new_foodcorps_service_members

Also read this MSU Extension News article by Terry McLean, which gives a great overview of FoodCorps as well as FoodCorps Michigan: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/foodcorps_michigan_cultivating_healthy_kids_through_healthy_school_diets

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Michigan Fresh has even more to offer

In a March 27 Spotlight, I mentioned how our Michigan State University Extension Michigan Fresh program educates on fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamentals as well as food safety, food storage, food preservation and gardening. In addition to this long list of important subjects, the Michigan Fresh work team is also busy on many other projects.

Extension educator Eileen Haraminac took over the coordination of the Michigan Fresh team upon Kathe Hale’s retirement.

Extension educator Joyce McGarry is busy heading up new fact sheet development. The team consists of Mary Dunckel, Michelle Jarvie, Ronald E. Kinnunen, Amanda Knox, Laurie Messing, Jeannie Nichols, Jeannine Schweihofer and Rob Weber. Team members arecompiling information on meats: pork, lamb, poultry, beef and fish. In the future, they will compile information for fact sheets on dairy products. Michigan Fresh fact sheets have been available at many of the farmers markets throughout the state as well as online. The fact sheets are also available in Arabic and Spanish. Find them on the Michigan Fresh website: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/program/info/mi_fresh

Other future fact sheets will focus on Michigan chestnuts (Erin Lizotte, Extension educator in the Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute) and growing hops (Greening Michigan Institute Extension educator Rob Sirrine).

Extension program instructor Stephanie Bruno heads up the team that’s developing recipe cards. The team consists of Jennifer Berkey, Becky Henne and Connie Kurple. These new recipe cards will be distributed at several farmers markets to encourage consumers to purchase Michigan-grown food to use as simple ingredients.

 Kristine Hahn and Eileen Haraminac as well as Sean Corp and other MSU Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) Communications staff are collaborating with the Eastern Market Corporation to promote a new product ‒ Michigan Fresh Frozen fruits and vegetables. The group is working on recipe cards to be distributed at Detroit Eastern Market and through the Peaches & Greens mobile produce trucks. The cards will promote both the Michigan Fresh program and the new Eastern Market Corporation Michigan Fresh Frozen products.

Eileen said, “We want to encourage people to choose nutrient-packed frozen fruits and vegetables when fresh are unavailable. Fruits and vegetables chosen for freezing are processed at their peak ripeness ‒ time when, as a general rule, they are most nutrient packed.

Extension associate program leader Becky Henne heads up the social media team. Team members are busy working to build a smartphone app and to develop additional videos. They hope to have the app ready to roll out for the 2015 season. This group is working with Dr. Dru Montri, executive director of Michigan Farmers Market Association; Colleen Matts, farm to institution outreach specialist with the MSU Center for Regional Food Systems; and Dr. Norm Lownds, curator of the 4-H Children’s Garden. Additional team members from both the Health and Nutrition Institute and the Greening Michigan Institute include Julie Darnton, Joanne Davidhizar, Dawn Earnesty, Kristine Hahn, Sheilah Hebert, Maggie Kantola and Kendra Wills.

Dr. Cheryl Peters, Maggie Kantola and Kendra Wills have been working with the Michigan Fresh team to develop a common evaluation tool for Michigan Fresh cooking demonstrations offered at the Detroit Eastern Market and the Grand Rapids Downtown Market. These cooking demonstrations benefit the promotion of the Michigan Fresh fact sheets and videos. The free, public demonstrations are designed to inspire people to purchase and consume more Michigan-grown fruits and vegetables. The evaluation tool will gather information from cooking demonstration observers. Recipes used in the cooking demonstrations come from the Michigan Fresh fact sheets and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

With coordination from Extension educator Terry McLean, MSU Extension will staff a kiosk at the Flint Farmers Market this spring.

Michigan Fresh is a great collaboration not only between our own institutes but between local organizations and farmers markets as well.

If you are interested in promoting the Michigan Fresh campaign materials at your community farmers market, please contact Eileen Haraminac (haramin2@anr.msu.edu) for more information.

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Genesee County voters approve millage to fund MSU Extension

The Genesee County Board of Commissioners voted in August to ask voters to approve a property tax millage dedicated to the support of Michigan State University Extension programs in their county. They had held a similar vote in November 2012, and that proposal, the last item on a very long ballot, failed. On Tuesday, Nov. 5, voters had another opportunity to decide this issue, and this time the proposal passed by a 55 percent majority. Funding for MSU Extension has been an issue for many years, and this five-year plan gives us greater certainty for staffing and program planning than we’ve had since 2005.

Many staff and stakeholders helped to inform voters about our programs and let them know how the millage would ensure ongoing availability of those programs. I’d like to thank and congratulate district coordinator Deanna East and Extension educators Darren Bagley, Julia Darnton, Terry McLean and Bob Tritten, 4-H coordinator Heidi Sovis, and the Friends of Extension group in Genesee County, led by volunteers Dee Godfrey and Ken and Diane Turland. County clerk John Gleason and State Senator Jim Ananich also provided valuable guidance and assistance.

Read more in this MLive article: http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2013/11/genesee_county_voters_were_gen.html

In addition, find more information in this Davison Index article: http://davisonindex.mihomepaper.com/news/2013-11-07/News/Michigan_State_Extension_millage_passes.html

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